The Collapse of the Baltic Tigers: How did Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania escape ruin?

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VisualPolitik EN published this video item, entitled “The Collapse of the Baltic Tigers: How did Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania escape ruin?” – below is their description.

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Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, the so-called Baltic republics, have experienced one of the highest economic growth rates in the world over the last three decades. However, their road to prosperity was not exactly a leisurely stroll in the woods. The Baltic countries had to face one of the biggest bubbles and crises in the old continent in living memory.

A huge crisis that they faced in a completely different way than what we are used to. This is the story of the miracle, collapse and recovery of the so-called Baltic Tigers.

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