Yasser Abbas: Will there be armed conflict over Nile dam dispute? | Talk to Al Jazeera

About This Source - Al Jazeera English

The video item below is a piece of English language content from Al Jazeera. Al Jazeera is a Qatari state-funded broadcaster based in Doha, Qatar, owned by the Al Jazeera Media Network.

Recent from Al Jazeera English:

  • Senegal: Muslim volunteers bury unidentified COVID-19 victims
  • International Nurses Day: Argentine health workers demanding better conditions
  • American Muslims creating digital Ramadan camps for kids
  • Al Jazeera English published this video item, entitled “Yasser Abbas: Will there be armed conflict over Nile dam dispute? | Talk to Al Jazeera” – below is their description.

    At 7,000 kilometres (4,350 miles), the Nile is Africa’s longest river. But a mega project, the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, has triggered a major dispute in the region.

    While Addis Ababa says the dam is crucial to its economic development, Cairo calls it an existential threat. And Khartoum fears the project will increase the risk of flooding and affect the safe operation of its own dams on the river.

    Can Ethiopia, Sudan, and Egypt find a diplomatic solution to their dispute, or will it escalate further? Sudan’s Irrigation Minister Yasser Abbas talks to Al Jazeera.

    Al Jazeera English YouTube Channel

    Got a comment? Leave your thoughts in the comments section, below. Please note comments are moderated before publication.

    In This Story: Cairo

    Cairo, Egypt’s sprawling capital, is set on the Nile River. At its heart is Tahrir Square and the vast Egyptian Museum, a trove of antiquities including royal mummies and gilded King Tutankhamun artifacts.

    2 Recent Items: Cairo

  • Egypt to produce China’s Sinovac COVID-19 vaccine in June
  • A night at an Egyptian museum during Ramadan
  • In This Story: Egypt

    Egypt, a country linking northeast Africa with the Middle East, dates to the time of the pharaohs. Millennia-old monuments sit along the fertile Nile River Valley, including Giza’s colossal Pyramids and Great Sphinx as well as Luxor’s hieroglyph-lined Karnak Temple and Valley of the Kings tombs.

    The capital, Cairo, is home to Ottoman landmarks like Muhammad Ali Mosque and the Egyptian Museum, a trove of antiquities. 

    4 Recent Items: Egypt

  • Film exhibition to bring authentic Xinjiang to global audience
  • Biden hopes Israel-Gaza conflict will end soon
  • Who to stop it? Scramble to prevent all-out war in the Middle East
  • Israel Steps Up Air Strikes on Hamas-Ruled Gaza Strip After Rocket Barrage
  • In This Story: Ethiopia

    Ethiopia, in the Horn of Africa, is a rugged, landlocked country split by the Great Rift Valley. With archaeological finds dating back more than 3 million years, it’s a place of ancient culture. Among its important sites are Lalibela with its rock-cut Christian churches from the 12th–13th centuries. Aksum is the ruins of an ancient city with obelisks, tombs, castles and Our Lady Mary of Zion church.

    3 Recent Items: Ethiopia

  • ‘Something’s not right’: See tense confrontation between CNN crew and soldiers
  • The Middle East, Myanmar, Somalia & other topics – Daily Briefing (12 May 2021)
  • Ethiopia launches first mobile money service
  • In This Story: Khartoum

    Khartoum or Khartum is the capital of Sudan. With a population of 5,274,321, its metropolitan area is the largest in Sudan. Khartoum is located at the confluence of the White Nile, flowing north from Lake Victoria, and the Blue Nile, flowing west from Lake Tana in Ethiopia.

    2 Recent Items: Khartoum

  • China-donated COVID-19 vaccines arrive in Sudan
  • Sudan: Economy continues to deteriorate under new gov’t
  • In This Story: Sudan

    The Sudan, officially the Republic of the Sudan, is a country in Northeast Africa. It is bordered by Egypt to the north, Libya to the northwest, Chad to the west, the Central African Republic to the southwest, South Sudan to the south, Ethiopia to the southeast, Eritrea to the east, and the Red Sea to the northeast.

    Sudan’s history goes back to the Pharaonic period. Independence from the British was proclaimed on 1 January 1956.

    Islam was Sudan’s state religion and Islamic laws applied from 1983 until 2020 when the country became a secular state. The economy has been described as lower-middle income and relies on oil production. Sudan is a member of the United Nations, the Arab League, African Union, COMESA, Non-Aligned Movement and the Organisation of Islamic Co-operation.

    3 Recent Items: Sudan

  • Tigray conflict fuels refugee crisis, struggle to deliver aid
  • The search for oxygen in Sudan
  • Sudan faces persistent human smuggling, trafficking from Ethiopia
  • Leave a Comment