Why is ‘balance’ key to China’s high-quality growth?

CGTN published this video item, entitled “Why is ‘balance’ key to China’s high-quality growth?” – below is their description.

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China and the U.S. are far from entering a new cold war with the highly integrated economies of the two countries, said Justin Yifu Lin, dean of the Institute of New Structural Economics at Peking University, in an interview with CGTN host Tian Wei. He said the U.S. and the former Soviet Union were two separate economic systems and they did not have much trade or personnel exchanges during the Cold War. He added China will spend more resources in technology innovation, and achieve high-quality economic growth in the future.

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About This Source - CGTN

This story is an English language news item from CGTN. CGTN is a Chinese state-funded broadcaster.

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