Why China is crushing Hong Kong dissent – BBC News

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  • BBC News published this video item, entitled “Why China is crushing Hong Kong dissent – BBC News” – below is their description.

    Hong Kong was rocked by mass violent anti-government protests in 2019 Now, the city is transformed – and not in the way protesters have hoped.

    The Chinese government has clamped down hard, putting in place restrictive rules and arresting scores of activists and opposition politicians.

    It passed a stringent national security law last year, and now it has reformed the way Hong Kong is run, ensuring only “patriots” can enter local government.

    But why exactly is China so bent on crushing dissent in Hong Kong?

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    In This Story: Hong Kong

    Hong Kong, officially the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China (HKSAR), is a metropolitan area and special administrative region of the People’s Republic of China on the eastern Pearl River Delta of the South China Sea. With over 7.5 million residents of various nationalities in a 1,104-square-kilometre (426 sq mi) territory, Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated places in the world.

    Hong Kong became a colony of the British Empire after the Qing Empire ceded Hong Kong Island at the end of the First Opium War in 1842. The colony expanded to the Kowloon Peninsula in 1860 after the Second Opium War and was further extended when Britain obtained a 99-year lease of the New Territories in 1898. The whole territory was transferred to China in 1997. As a special administrative region, Hong Kong maintains separate governing and economic systems from that of mainland China under the principle of “one country, two systems”.

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