Protested in Paris Continue Against a French bill Outlawing Use of Police Images

About This Source - Bloomberg QuickTake: Now

Bloomberg L.P. is a privately held financial, software, data, and media company headquartered in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

It was founded by Michael Bloomberg in 1981, with the help of Thomas Secunda, Duncan MacMillan, Charles Zegar, and a 12% ownership investment by Merrill Lynch.

Recent from Bloomberg QuickTake: Now:

  • Australian Open Players in Quarantine: What’s the Public Mood?
  • Iran Imposes Symbolic Sanctions on Trump in Parting Blow to Administration
  • WHO Raises Concerns About Covid Vaccine Distribution in Palestine
  • Bloomberg Quicktake: Now published this video item, entitled “Protested in Paris Continue Against a French bill Outlawing Use of Police Images” – below is their description.

    Thousands protested in Paris on Saturday against a proposed French bill that could make it more difficult for witnesses to film police officers.

    Tensions rose as “protest-crashers” set fire to cars, pillaged a bank and tossed objects at police, the AP reported.

    Tens of thousands of critics of a proposed security law that would restrict the filming of police officers protested across France on Saturday, and officers in Paris who were advised to behave responsibly during the demonstrations repeatedly fired tear gas to disperse rowdy protesters who set fire to France’s central bank and threw paving stones.

    The mood was largely peaceful, however, as dozens of rallies took place against a provision of the law that would make it a crime to publish photos or video of on-duty police officers with the intent of harming their “physical or psychological integrity.”

    Civil liberties groups, journalists, and people who have faced police abuse are concerned that the measure will stymie press freedoms and allow police brutality to go undiscovered and unpunished.

    “We have to broaden the debate, and by doing that, we say that if there were no police violence, we wouldn’t have to film violent policemen,” Assa Traore, a prominent anti-brutality activist whose brother died in police custody in 2016, told The Associated Press.

    She was among at least 46,000 people who packed the sprawling Republique plaza and surrounding streets carrying red union flags, French tricolor flags and homemade signs denouncing police violence, demanding media freedom or calling for the resignation of French President Emmanuel Macron or his tough-talking interior minister, Gerald Darmanin.

    The crowd included journalists, journalism students, left-wing activists, migrants rights groups and citizens of varied political stripes expressing anger over what they perceive as hardening police tactics in recent years, especially since France’s yellow vest protest movement against economic hardship emerged in 2018.

    Violence erupted near the end of the march as small groups of protesters pelted riot police with small rocks and paving stone. The officers retaliated with volleys of tear gas, prompting minor scuffles. Rioters then set fire to the facade of the central bank and to police barricades; in the melee fire trucks struggled to reach the site.

    Macron’s government says the law is needed to protect police amid threats and attacks by a violent fringe.

    But the chief editor of French newspaper Le Monde, Luc Bronner, argued at the protest that the law against publishing images of officers is unnecessary.

    “There are already laws that exist to protect civil servants, including police forces when they’re targeted, and it’s legitimate – the police do a very important job,” Bronner said. “But that’s not what this is about. It’s about limiting the capacity of citizens and along with them, journalists, to document police violence when they happen.”

    While journalists have been the most outspoken over the security bill, it could have an even greater impact on the efforts of non-journalists who film police during aggressive arrests, notably minorities who can try to fight police abuse and discrimination with a few seconds of cellphone video.

    “There were all those protests in the summer against police violence, and this law shows the government didn’t hear us… It’s the impunity. That’s what makes us so angry,” protest participant Kenza Berkane, 26, said.

    Berkane, who is French and of North African origin, described being repeatedly stopped by police for identity checks in the metro or while going to school. while white friends were allowed to pass. “We ask ourselves, when will this stop?”

    Bloomberg Quicktake: Now YouTube Channel

    Got a comment? Leave your thoughts in the comments section, below. Please note comments are moderated before publication.

    In This Story: Emmanuel Macron

    Emmanuel Jean-Michel Frédéric Macron is a French politician who has been President of France and ex officio Co-Prince of Andorra since 14 May 2017. In the legislative elections a month later, Macron’s party, renamed “La République En Marche!” (LREM), secured a majority in the National Assembly. At the age of 39, Macron became the youngest president in French history.

    Books #Ad

    4 Recent Items: Emmanuel Macron

  • Macron hails French Muslim council charter to combat extremism
  • One Planet Summit & other topics – Daily Briefing (11 January 2021)
  • Donors pledge $14 billion for African ‘Green Wall’
  • One Planet Summit for biodiversity
  • In This Story: France

    France is a republic and the largest Western European nation. Through expansion and colonisation in the 17th and 18th centuries France became a great power and still retains territories around the world. It has a seat on the UN security council and is the world’s fourth most wealthy country with a high standard of living and strong cultural identity.

    6 Recent Items: France

  • Change at the White House: Can Joe Biden be the next Roosevelt?
  • What is Joe Biden’s plan to rescue the US economy?
  • In parting shot, Trump administration accuses China of ‘genocide’ against Uighurs
  • Trump grants clemency to former advisor Steve Bannon in final round of pardons
  • A new chapter for the Black Lives Matter movement?
  • UK sees record new Covid-19 deaths as virus variant identified in 60 countries
  • Leave a Comment