Police fire teargas at protestors outside interior minister’s home in Beirut

Guardian News published this video item, entitled “Police fire teargas at protestors outside interior minister’s home in Beirut” – below is their description.

Police have fired tear gas to disperse relatives of victims of last year’s Beirut port blast who were protesting outside the home of the caretaker interior minister over his refusal to let the lead investigator question Lebanon’s security chief. Nearly a year after the explosion, which killed more than 200 people, wounded thousands and devastated swathes of the capital, many Lebanese are furious that no senior officials have been held to account.

EU prepares sanctions against Lebanon leaders a year after Beirut blast

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  • In This Story: Lebanon

    Lebanon, officially known as the Lebanese Republic, is a country in the Levant region of Western Asia, and the transcontinental region of the Middle East.

    The official language, Arabic, is the most common language spoken by the citizens of Lebanon. Its capital is Beirut.

    Lebanon was a founding member of the United Nations in 1945 and is a member of the Arab League (1945), the Non-Aligned Movement (1961), Organisation of the Islamic Cooperation (1969), and the Organisation internationale de la francophonie (1973).

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