North and South Korea restore severed cross-border hotline

Al Jazeera English published this video item, entitled “North and South Korea restore severed cross-border hotline” – below is their description.

Seoul says the leaders of North and South Korea have agreed to restore communication channels and improve relations.

The agreement follows the exchange of several letters between South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

It comes amid stalled attempts by the US to engage with North Korea over Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons programme.

Al Jazeera’s Rob McBride reports from Seoul, South Korea.

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#SouthKorea #NorthKorea #InterKoreanCommunications

Al Jazeera English YouTube Channel

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About This Source - Al Jazeera English

The video item below is a piece of English language content from Al Jazeera. Al Jazeera is a Qatari state-funded broadcaster based in Doha, Qatar, owned by the Al Jazeera Media Network.

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