Live: Kingdom of white-headed langur in S China

About This Source - CGTN

This story is an English language news item from CGTN. CGTN is a Chinese state-funded broadcaster.

Recent from CGTN:

  • Cotton field drummer from China’s Xinjiang goes viral online
  • Swiss ambassador to China: Hainan is not just for duty free goods
  • Live: View of Huanglong Scenic and Historic Interest Area in SW China – Ep. 11
  • CGTN published this video item, entitled “Live: Kingdom of white-headed langur in S China” – below is their description.

    The white-headed langur is technically known as Trachypithecus leucocephalus. It is one of the 25 most endangered primates in the world and is considered among the rarest monkey species. The animal is conspicuous because of its long tail and hairstyle that makes it look like it’s wearing a pointed yellowish-white hat. They dwell in karst hills in south China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and need to eat more than 30 kinds of leaves a day, which partly explains why their population is small. Follow us to watch the agile creature move from tree to tree. #TidesofChina

    CGTN YouTube Channel

    Got a comment? Leave your thoughts in the comments section, below. Please note comments are moderated before publication.

    In This Story: China

    China is the third largest country in the world by area and the largest country in the world by population. Properly known as the People’s Republic of China, the political territory of the country includes the former nations of Tibet and Hong Kong. The capital is Beijing.

    7 Recent Items: China

  • Is China’s space debris dangerous? | DW News
  • Cotton field drummer from China’s Xinjiang goes viral online
  • Swiss ambassador to China: Hainan is not just for duty free goods
  • Live: View of Huanglong Scenic and Historic Interest Area in SW China – Ep. 11
  • Van driver stops inches away from hitting child in China
  • Leopard on the loose after escaping Hangzhou Safari Park
  • Live: Natural beauty – China’s widest waterfall – Ep. 22
  • Leave a Comment