Hong Kong Police Arrest Activist Agnes Chow Under National Security Law

Hong Kong Police arrested prominent pro-democracy activist Agnes Chow Ting late on Monday under the new national security law on charges of inciting secession, according to tweets by fellow activist Nathan Law, who is currently in Britain.

A post on Chow’s official Facebook on Monday evening said police had arrived at her home and that her lawyers were rushing to the scene.

Footage from TVB Hong Kong showed Chow being escorted out of her home and driven away by police.

The former member of now-disbanded political organization Demosisto appeared in court last week after she pleaded guilty to inciting others to participate in an unlawful assembly, as well as to participating in an unauthorized assembly, related to protests in June last year.

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In This Story: Hong Kong

Hong Kong, officially the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China (HKSAR), is a metropolitan area and special administrative region of the People’s Republic of China on the eastern Pearl River Delta of the South China Sea. With over 7.5 million residents of various nationalities in a 1,104-square-kilometre (426 sq mi) territory, Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated places in the world.

Hong Kong became a colony of the British Empire after the Qing Empire ceded Hong Kong Island at the end of the First Opium War in 1842. The colony expanded to the Kowloon Peninsula in 1860 after the Second Opium War and was further extended when Britain obtained a 99-year lease of the New Territories in 1898. The whole territory was transferred to China in 1997. As a special administrative region, Hong Kong maintains separate governing and economic systems from that of mainland China under the principle of “one country, two systems”.

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