At least six killed in Taiwan bus crash

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    https://news.cgtn.com/news/2021-03-17/At-least-six-killed-in-Taiwan-bus-crash-YHlkEDihCE/index.html

    A tourist coach ran into a hillside along a highway in Yilan Couty, China’s Taiwan region, on Tuesday afternoon, killing six and injuring 39, the local fire department said.

    The bus, with 45 people on board, was on its way from Hualien county in eastern Taiwan to Taipei when the accident took place at about 4 p.m., according to the local fire department.

    Those who were injured have been rushed to nearby hospitals. Local authorities are investigating the cause of the incident.

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    In This Story: Taiwan

    Taiwan, officially the Republic of China, is a country in East Asia. Neighbouring countries include the People’s Republic of China to the northwest, Japan to the northeast, and the Philippines to the south.

    The political status of Taiwan is complicated. The Republic of China (ROC) is no longer a member of the UN, having been replaced by the People’s Republic of China (PRC) in 1971. Taiwan is claimed by the PRC, which refuses diplomatic relations with countries that recognise the ROC. Taiwan maintains official diplomatic relations with 14 out of 193 UN member states and the Holy See.

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