Are BLM prosecutions a deliberate crackdown? | The Stream

Al Jazeera English published this video item, entitled “Are BLM prosecutions a deliberate crackdown? | The Stream” – below is their description.

People across the United States have continued to demand racial justice since the killing of George Floyd at the hands of police sparked a summer of popular protest. But for many demonstrators, calling for change has led to them being branded criminals. Over the last five months, thousands of protesters supportive of Black Lives Matter and anti-fascist movements have been arrested by police while exercising their constitutional right to assemble – and hundreds are now facing serious charges that carry prison terms and fines. Many of those facing criminal proceedings say they were peacefully protesting before being arrested on flimsy pretexts by overzealous police. In this episode of The Stream we’ll hear from racial justice and migrant rights activists who have faced intimidation, arrest and prosecution – and what their experiences suggest about Americans’ ability to rightfully protest under the First Amendment. Join the conversation: TWITTER: https://twitter.com/AJStream FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/AJStream Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe #Aljazeeraenglish #News #Aljazeeraenglish #News #blacklivesmatter #unitedstates

Al Jazeera English YouTube Channel

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About This Source - Al Jazeera English

The video item below is a piece of English language content from Al Jazeera. Al Jazeera is a Qatari state-funded broadcaster based in Doha, Qatar, owned by the Al Jazeera Media Network.

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In This Story: George Floyd

George Floyd was an African-American man who died on 25th May 2020 in Powderhorn, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, following police arrest. Video recording by a witness, showing Floyd repeating “Please”, “I can’t breathe”, and “Don’t kill me”, was widely circulated on social media platforms and broadcast by media. The incident led to widespread protests across the United States.

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In This Story: Police

The police are a constituted body of persons empowered by a state, with the aim to enforce the law, to ensure the safety, health and possessions of citizens, and to prevent crime and civil disorder. Their lawful powers include arrest and the use of force legitimized by the state via the monopoly on violence.

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The United States is a country also known as the United States of America, USA, US or just America. There are fifty states in the union, which is a federal republic ruled by a representative democracy. Nearly ten million square kilometres are inhabited by over 300 million people. The majority of Americans speak English.

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