Aerial China: Working as a power line engineer requires courage

CGTN published this video item, entitled “Aerial China: Working as a power line engineer requires courage” – below is their description.

For more: https://www.cgtn.com/video Check out this dangerous job in which power line engineers must climb 70-meter-high (230 feet) transmission towers to perform safety checks on the high-voltage transmission lines. At this height, strong winds force the workers to stay low and rely on their safety rope. An ability to work together makes it go more smoothly. Each worker must check eight kilometers of cables to find any potential problems. Sometimes, there are over 100 workers in the air at once. The system must be overhauled on an annual basis.

CGTN YouTube Channel

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About This Source - CGTN

This story is an English language news item from CGTN. CGTN is a Chinese state-funded broadcaster.

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