Communication to the Public: The Next Frontier: CIPIL Evening Webinar

Subscribe to The Global Herald in Google News

Cambridge Law Faculty published this video item, entitled “Communication to the Public: The Next Frontier: CIPIL Evening Webinar” – below is their description.

Speaker: Dr Justin Koo, University of the West Indies (UWI)

Biography: Justin obtained his LLB from the University of Kent in 2011. He then completed his LLM in Intellectual Property Law at King’s College London in 2012. Following this he completed his PhD at King’s College London in 2016. The thesis comprised the title: ‘The proper scope of the communication to the public right in EU copyright law’. Prior to joining the UWI, Justin was a Visiting Lecturer at King’s College London where he taught Trade Marks and Passing Off and Intellectual Property Law to undergraduate students on the LLB programme. Justin was also a Teaching Fellow at University College London (UCL) where he taught Intellectual Property Law to undergraduates on the LLB and Trade Marks and Brands to postgraduate LLM students. Justin is an Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy of the UK and provides consultation and expert advice pertaining to the management of intellectual property works and portfolios.

Abstract: The development of the communication to the public right under Article 3 of the Information Society Directive has been one of the most hotly contested copyright issues for the last decade. The Court of Justice of the European Union’s rulings in Svensson and GS Media exacerbated the problems with the communication to the public right that were evident since Rafael Hoteles. Similarly, the post-GS Media case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union has only served to further undermine the coherence of the communication to the public right. However, since GS Media, there have been three significant developments that challenge the status quo of the jurisprudence relating to the communication to the public right in the context of Article 3 of the Information Society Directive. Notably, Article 17 of the Digital Single Market Directive, Case C-392/19 VG Bild-Kunst and Joined Cases C-682/18 and C-683/18 YouTube. Taken together, these three elements form the beginning of the new frontier for the development of the communication to the public right. This paper will explore these three developments and examine their impact on the existing scope of the communication to the public right as understood under Article 3 of the Information Society Directive, the implications for platforms that rely on user generated content and the issues with parallel communication to the public rights under Article 3 of the Information Society Directive and Article 17 of the Digital Single Market Directive.

For more information see: https://www.cipil.law.cam.ac.uk/seminars-and-events/cipil-seminars

Cambridge Law Faculty YouTube Channel

Got a comment? Leave your thoughts in the comments section, below. Please note comments are moderated before publication.


Subscribe to The Global Herald in Google News

About This Source - Cambridge Law Faculty

The Faculty of Law, Cambridge is the law school of the University of Cambridge. In 2018, it was ranked the best law school in the United Kingdom and second best law school in the world.

Books from Cambridge Law #Ad

Recent from Cambridge Law Faculty:

  • The Realist Trend of the Court of Justice of the European Union: CELS webinar
  • Should a Constitution Protect Innocent People from Criminal Conviction?: CCCJ Seminar
  • The role of scientists and lawyers in delivering public policy – insights from Covid-19: CSLG
  • In This Story: 2012

    2012 is a film directed by Roland Emmerich and released in 2009. The film depicts a natural disaster in which the Earth’s core heats up, causes unprecedented solar storms and ultimately wipes out most of the world’s population in a major flood.

    1 Recent Items: 2012

  • Laura Kenny back in London 9 years on from 2012 | UCI Track Champions League | Eurosport
  • Leave a Comment

    We don't require your email address, or your name, for anyone to leave a comment. If you do add an email address, you may be notified if there are replies to your comment - we won't use it for any other purpose. Please make respectful comments, which add value, and avoid personal attacks on others. Links are not allowed in comments - 99% of spam comments, attempt to post links. Please describe where people may find additional information - for example "visit the UN website" or "search Google for..." rather than posting a link. Comments failing to adhere to these guidelines will not be published.

    Posting....